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800.701.2736

Lock-Out / Tag-Out 29 CFR 1910.147

General Background:

Approximately three million workers in the United States on a daily basis, face extreme risk from uncontrolled energy when servicing machinery. Serious injury or death can be the result. Typical non-lethal injuries include fractures, lacerations, contusions, amputations, puncture wounds, electric shock, and falls. The average lost time for injuries runs approximately 24 days. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that approximately 120 fatalities and approximately 28,000 serious and 32,000 minor injuries each year could be prevented if proper lockout/tagout procedures at job sites are initiated. This poses a serious problem for exposed workers and their employer. The OSHA Control of Hazardous Energy Sources Standard establishes uniform requirements to ensure that the hazards of uncontrolled energy in U.S. workplaces are evaluated, safety procedures implemented, and that the proper hazard information is transmitted to all affected workers.

The following course outline is designed to make the employee aware of the hazards associated with the control of hazardous energy.

  1. Overview
    1. Lock-Out/Tag-Out terms
    2. Energy sources in the workplace
    3. Locks and Tags as energy isolation and control devices.
    4. A procedure for safely applying and removing locks and tags.
  2. Definitions
    1. Distinguishing between “affected” and ” authorized” employees.
    2. Definitions
      1. Lock-Out
      2. Tag-Out
      3. Energy isolating device
    3. Service and maintenance activities that require Lock-Out/Tag-Out
  3. Energy Sources
    1. Kinetic versus potential energy
    2. Types of energy in the workplace
  4. Locks and Tags
    1. The use of locks and tags as energy isolation and control devices
    2. General procedure for safely applying and removing locks and tags
    3. Regulations about restarting or reenergizing locked out or tag out equipment.
    4. Limitations of tag-out devices

NOTE: CSEM, Inc. may be contacted in the future to schedule a workplace evaluation of the Lock-Out/Tag-Out procedures in the work place. This segment of the OSHA requirement can be easily documented by the employer and is not included in this proposal but will be mentioned in training.